Eugene Sledge
* screen colors may vary from print colors

All prints are sold unframed

Print Size: 31" x 19"
Off the Beach!
- With The Old Breed on Peleliu -
a fine art print by Matt Hall
The first release in our Marines of the Pacific series!
It is 8:30 a.m. on Sept. 15, 1944 as the Marines of King Company churn onto Peleliu. Vehicle exhaust, gun smoke, and burning vegetation choke the air as Japanese artillery and mortars pound the pre-sighted beaches. Machine gun bullets rip across the sand as Eugene Sledge, in his baptism of fire, trails veteran R.V. Burgin. Sent to capture Peleliu’s airfield from an enemy of unknown strength, the men of K-3-5 and their brothers of the 1st Marine Division know they are in the fight of their lives. But, for now, only one thought echoes through their minds: Get off the beach!
Peleliu Landing

Only 500 prints, signed and numbered
by artist Matt Hall & 2 veterans including:

R.V. Burgin, the squad leader of Sledge & SNAFU Shelton!

Jim Young
, who served with Leckie & Phillips in H-Co.!

ALSO INCLUDES: Color COA

(Prints are sold unframed.)

SOLD OUT
Contact us for re-sale availability

Only 160 prints, signed and numbered by
artist Matt Hall & at least 6 veterans including:

R.V. Burgin
, the squad leader of Eugene Sledge & SNAFU Shelton!
Jim McEnery, a K-Company sergeant who fought
on Guadalcanal, Cape Gloucester, & Peleliu!
Jim Young, H-Company (H-2-1), who fought alongside fellow H-Co. Marine Robert Leckie on Guadalcanal, Cape Gloucester, & Peleliu!
Plus 3 distinguished Marine signers from our list below!

PACKAGE INCLUDES:
Photos of Eugene Sledge and R.V. Burgin to frame with your print!
1st Marine Division pin to frame with your print!

Color COA with "History Behind the Art" stories and trivia

Peleliu
(Prints are sold unframed.)

SOLD OUT
Contact us for re-sale availability

Only 140 prints signed and numbered by
artist Matt Hall & at least 9 veterans including:

R.V. Burgin, the squad leader of Eugene Sledge & SNAFU Shelton!
"Red" Womack, the flamethrower operator depicted in the mini-series
__and With the Old Breed book!
Jim Young, H-Company (H-2-1), who fought alongside fellow H-Co. Marine Robert Leckie on Guadalcanal, Cape Gloucester, & Peleliu!
Plus 6 distinguished Marine signers from our list below!

PACKAGE INCLUDES:
Photos of Eugene Sledge and R.V. Burgin to frame with your print!
1st Marine Division pin to frame with your print!

Color COA with "History Behind the Art" stories and trivia

Battle of Peleliu
(Prints are sold unframed.)
A 100 print Gallery Edition (limited-edition, artist signed) will be available only at special events to fund the veterans' travel. A canvas edition of 44 prints may be made available in the future.

James Anderson
K-Company (K-3-5)
Cape Gloucester,
Peleliu & Okinawa

R.V. Burgin
K-Company (K-3-5)
Cape Gloucester,
Peleliu & Okinawa

James Burke
K-Company (K-3-5)
Cape Gloucester,
Peleliu & Okinawa

Jesse Googe
K-Company (K-3-5)
Guadalcanal, Cape Gloucester & Peleliu

Dan Lawler
K-Company (K-3-5)
Peleliu & Okinawa

Sterling Mace
K-Company (K-3-5)
Peleliu & Okinawa

Jim McEnery
K-Company (K-3-5)
Guadalcanal, Cape Gloucester & Peleliu

CL "Red" Womack
M-Company (M-3-5)
Cape Gloucester,
Peleliu & Okinawa

Jim Young
H-Company (H-2-1)
Guadalcanal, Cape Gloucester & Peleliu
This lineup of heroes represents the most multiple-campaign veterans ever to sign a Valor Studios print. Among these Marines of the Pacific are new, first-time signers:

Jim Anderson, Jim Burke, and R.V. Burgin are on the K-Company "Roll of Honor" as 3 of only 26 Peleliu veterans of K-3-5 still standing by the end of the Okinawa Campaign.

Jim Young was a member of H-2-1, the same Company as Robert Leckie, and he fought with Leckie for the same Peleliu airfield as the men of K-3-5.

"Red" Womack of M-3-5 is the flamethrower operator shown in Episode 7 of HBO's The Pacific, who burns out a bunker under Burgin's direction. Womack floated between units and considers himself as close to K-3-5 as any.

Jesse Googe and Jim McEnery represent an "Old Breed" within K-3-5, as each fought on the 'Canal with men like Capt. Andrew Haldane and Gunney Elmo Haney in the battles where the rock of K-3-5 was formed.

Dan Lawler and Sterling Mace, like Eugene Sledge, famously served with the Old Breed at Peleliu and Okinawa and saw more combat in those two campaigns than any man would ever wish to endure. But endure they did.

Valor Studios is honored to have this distinguished Marine "Band of Brothers" to inaugurate our new print series!
Off the Beach!

1. Older model LVT-2's such as this one supplemented the newer LVT-4's during the assault. One of the major drawbacks of the LVT-2 was the lack of a ramp door, which resulted in the Marines having to go over the side and expose themselves to enemy fire in the process.

2. Pfc. Robert Oswalt, according to Sledge, was an "extremely intelligent and intellectually active young man," who planned on becoming a brain surgeon after the war. Sadly, he would be killed in the ensuing fighting.

3. Eugene Sledge hits the beach bearing 60mm mortar ammo. He would later recall the landing in “With the Old Breed”: "Shells crashed all around. Fragments tore and whirred, slapping on the sand and splashing into the water a few yards behind us. The Japanese were recovering from the shock of our prelanding bombardment. Their machine gun and rifle fire got thicker, snapping viciously overhead in increasing volume."

4. Because the Marine Corps did not have a medical branch, a Navy hospital corpsman would be assigned to each Marine infantry platoon. This corpsman wears no Red Cross armband or other markings following the discovery during the Guadalcanal campaign that the Japanese targeted medical personnel.

5. R.V. Burgin was a veteran of Cape Gloucester and a corporal in charge of a 60mm mortar squad. Here, he carries his M-1 Garand rifle, a weapon he picked up on Cape Gloucester. He recalled the assault: "Number 13 rolled up onto the beach and we bailed over the sides, dropped to the sand and took off running. That's Marine doctrine. Get off the beach. You're a target. You're cluttering things up. Move out!"

6. Cpl. "Red" Womack of Mississippi, whom Sledge recalled as, "a brave, good-natured guy . . . but he was one of the fiercest looking Marines I ever saw. He was big and husky with a fiery red beard well powdered with white coral dust. He reminded me of some wild Viking. I was glad we were on the same side."

7. K-Company riflemen like this Marine, landed just prior to the unit’s heavy weapons squads. One such rifleman, Pfc. Bill Leyden of New York, would later be wounded on Peleliu and hospitalized for three months.

8. Cpl. Merriell "Snafu" Shelton of Louisiana carried his squad's 60mm mortar during the beach assault. Sledge remembered Snafu as, "a good Marine and an expert mortarman. His performance of his duties bore absolutely no resemblance to his nickname, "Situation Normal All Fouled Up."

9. K-Company rifleman Sterling Mace remembered the assault beach as: "a little stretch of white sand with a backdrop of solid black smoke hiding the silhouette of tropical terrain . . ." The smoke was the result of bombardment from naval guns and attack aircraft which had been ongoing since 5:30AM.

10. Sgt. Jim McEnery represent an "Old Breed" within K-3-5, as he fought on the 'Canal with men like Capt. Andrew Haldane and Gunney Elmo Haney in the battles where the rock of K-3-5 was formed.

11. This LVT amtrac, the newer LVT(4) model, featured a rear ramp that lowered for quick egress of the Marines within. This LVT has survived the ride into the beach but its fate is still uncertain as 26 LVTs were destroyed on Peleliu’s D-Day alone.

12. LVT(A)4 amtracs such as this one preceded the first assault wave to provide fire suppression from their 75mm howitzers.

13. F6F Hellcats from the USS Princeton provide close air support to the Marines. In all, three fleet carriers, five light carriers, and 11 escort carriers would supply air assets during the Peleliu campaign.

MATT HALL
Artist Matt Hall

Now acknowledged as the rising talent in military art, Matt Hall worked for years under master visionary, Steven Spielberg, at Spielberg’s DreamWorks company! These days, however, Matt no longer paints to serve the icons of Hollywood—he paints to pay tribute to America’s military heroes.

Matt’s artistic training began as a boy in Missouri, when he met an old-time western artist named Bob Tommy, who just moved from Texas. Tommy encouraged Matt to try his hand at painting. When Tommy saw Matt’s “natural talent,” he became Matt’s mentor and taught him the technique he had amassed in his lifetime of work.

In college, Matt studied painting. After graduation, he broadened his skills, painting everything from greeting cards to animation backgrounds. His career changed forever when Spielberg’s DreamWorks company found and hired him. Matt brought and his new bride, Michele, a Texas small-town girl, with him to Hollywood.

At DreamWorks, Matt rose through the ranks, painting concept art. When Steven Spielberg had an idea brewing about the Battle for Iwo Jima, Matt painted an “epic concept” for him that Spielberg used to pitch the film, Flags of Our Fathers. Soon, Matt was named Franchise Art Director for DreamWorks’ Medal of Honor video games series, one credited with generating interest in WWII history among young people.

Matt grew as an artist through Spielberg’s critiques. “I learned from Steven Spielberg the value of listening to my ‘creative instincts’” Matt explained. “A lot of times, marketing dictates if an idea will be well-received, but Spielberg would often fly against the grain, if he believed in an idea. There was a time when the marketing guys said ‘WWII is done and dead,” but Spielberg followed his instincts and passion and made Saving Private Ryan!”

There, Matt discovered that he, too, possessed a passion to tell the stories of America’s war heroes when DreamWorks had him create paintings for the Congressional Medal of Honor Society. Working from just a citation and a portrait of a long-deceased MOH recipient, Matt brought their stories back to life. There, he discovered his calling. _

Matt Hall was requested to do a painting for President George W. Bush, showing the F-102s of the Texas ANG.
Photo courtesy of the White House.

Valor Studios and Matt Hall wish to thank the Sledge family, Henry, Jeanne, and John, for their support of this project. We also wish to thank Marvin Schroeder and the National Museum of the Pacific War for their gear/uniform consultation, and Miss Audrey Phillips for this photo from The Pacific premiere.